Concern over gas exploration in the SE

As you may be aware, a number of residents in the South East have concerns regarding any mining or petroleum activities, particularly with large swaths of exploration licences over their properties.  The most concerning area is water security.  When there are droughts, the South East residents are fully dependent on the groundwater.  Health concerns, keeping the South East’s world renowned  clean and green image for export growth, and impacts on the economy are other concerns.  2015 – 2016, the value of agriculture in the SE, was  $3.2 billion, which was 51% of the total gross value of agricultural production in SA.
The geology and hydrology, including limestone, cavernous systems, and fault lines are not suitable for any drilling or mining and petroleum activities, apart from extractive mining for road and building materials.  With both mining and petroleum activities, there are risks to the groundwater, soil and air, through loss of well integrity, any dewatering of the aquifers, waste water disposal from gas or oil activities and no suitable way for safe disposal, contamination from tailing and benefication ponds for mining, salt impacts and landscape changes. Emissions and waste water ponds may impact bird life.  There has been a shocking disaster in Canada, where 7500 song birds flew into a gas flare at a gas processing plant and died.
All gas needs flaring. I understand, if there is viable amounts of gas, the Katnook Gas Plant will be upgraded. In other places, including Australia,  my colleagues have told me that there have been a number of animal and bird deaths that may have died through road kill and extra traffic on the roads, and also through drinking water from the contaminated waste water ponds.
I would like these concerns to be on the agenda in the South Australian Parliament, after the election.  

Tim Flannery and Ursula Rakova

Wendy Flannery, of Climate Frontlines, FoE Brisbane, writes that  Ursula Rakova, the director of Tulele Peisa, a FoE Australia affiliate in Bougainville PNG will be in town to address the Womad Planet talks.

While here, she will also appear at an event at the Hawke Centre (details below)


 THURSDAY 8 MARCH 2018, 6.00PM – 7.15PM


Presented by the Hawke Centre, in arrangement with WOMADelaide Festival’s Planet Talks Program, a free public lecture delivered by Tim Flannery (Australia) and Ursula Rakova (PNG), discussing the beauty and environmental challenges facing Papua New Guinea.


Tim Flannery is one of the world’s most prominent environmentalists. In 2007 he was named ‘Australian of the Year’, arguably Australia’s highest honour. He delivered the 2002 Australia Day Address to the nation. In 2013 he founded, and is now chief councilor, of the Australian Climate Council, Australia’s largest and most successful crowdfunded organisation. His latest book is ‘Sunlight and Seaweed.’ Text Publishing. 2017.




ursula rakova

Climate justice advocate Ursula Rakova of Papua New Guinea gives a human face to the challenges faced in the Pacific from environmental degradation. She is a pioneer in Papua New Guinea’s environmental movement and campaigner for the survival of her people. 

Born on Papua New Guinea’s Carteret Islands in the Southwestern Pacific, an area which is threatened by rising sea levels. She and her community are among the world’s first climate change refugees. Frustrated by inaction on the part of the Papua New Guinea (PNG) government, Rakova’s community took matters into their own hands and formed Tulele Peisa (“Sailing in the wind on our own”) –  a community-based organisation helping to relocate the Carterets’ population to safer ground.

In 2008, Ursula received the Pride of PNG award for her contribution to the environment.


Repower SA: aim for 100% renewables by 2025

Solar Citizens worked with Nicky Ison from the Community Power Agency on a new blueprint called Repowering South Australia, which not only shows how South Australia can get to 100% renewables by 2025, but also how we can ensure nobody is left behind along the way.

To get there, Repowering South Australia recommends:

  1. Making South Australia a renewable energy superpower by setting a 100% renewable energy target by 2025 and making a plan to export a further 50% outside of the state through technologies such as hydrogen.
  2. Supporting low-income households by establishing a publicly-owned non-profit retailer to secure cheap, renewable power.
  3. Boosting local manufacturing by establishing renewable energy industry precincts in locations where renewable energy hotspots meet energy-intensive industry.
  4. Working with Aboriginal communities to design a well-funded Indigenous Communities Clean Power Program.
  5. Giving communities back power by establishing regional community energy hubs that increase community benefit from renewable projects.

— Dan Spencer outlines the reccomendations here on

The Repower SA campaign launch is at The Joinery, February 14 at 6:30pm – 8:30pm. RSVP here


Adani Plans take another hit

The prospects of the mega coal mine and rail project planned for Queensland’s Galilee Basin by Indian giant Adani have taken a fresh hit, after listed Australian freight company Aurizon said it was no longer seeking federal funding to build the project’s rail line.

Aurizon said on Friday that it would be withdrawing its application for funding under Northern Australia Infrastructure Facility, or NAIF, due to a failure to secure “definitive contractual arrangements with any proponent.”

— Sophie Vorrath, writing for reneweconomy Feb 9th


10th national GM Free Aus Alliance Conference: Feb 10th & 11th

You are invited to express your interest

Participate in the 10th national GMFAA Conference

9am Saturday Feb 10 to 5pm Sunday Feb 11,
at the Joinery,111 Franklin St, Adelaide SA 5000.
Join delegates from WA, SA, Tas and Victoria.
Express interest and we’ll send you the whole agenda.
More information:
GMFAA Coordinator, Jessica Harrison
GM-Free Australia Alliance Inc more >>