Vote for a Solar Thermal Power Station in Pt Augusta

Repower Pt Augusta invite you to take the following actions to let politicians know you want more clean energy in SA and a solar thermal power plant in Pt Augusta is the ideal way to achieve it.

“The Repower Port Augusta Alliance has developed a solid proposal to replace the coal plants with 6 solar thermal plants and 95 wind turbines. This will create 1800 jobs, save 5 million tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions, improve the health of the local community and ensure energy security and stable electricity prices.… Read more >>


End the Blame Game and Back Renewables Open Letter

Yes2RenewablesYes2Renewables invite you to sign the online petition to Malcolm Turnbull asking him to stop blaming power blackouts and electricity price spikes on renewable energy.

“South Australia is a renewable energy success story. The state is fast approaching 50 percent renewables and has booming solar, energy storage, and wind power sectors.

This success has made South Australia public enemy number one for the fossil fuel lobby, who will do anything to stop our transition to 100 percent renewables.… Read more >>

Solar – not so intermittent – Sustainable Engineering meeting 14/11

Join members of FOE-Adl’s Clean Futures Collective at this meeting hosted by Sustainable Engineering.

Solar – Not so Intermittent
Mon 14/11
5:30pm Flinders Uni building Vic Square
by Sustainable Engineering
SolarReserve – CSP with molten salt energy storage technology
SolarReserve is a leading global developer of utility-scale solar power projects headquartered in California, USA with offices in Africa, the Asia-Pacific region, Middle East and Europe. The company has commercialised a proprietary advanced solar thermal technology with integrated energy storage that enables firm, fully dispatchable, non-intermittent electricity to be generated from the sun, day or night. SolarReserve has successfully financed and constructed more than US$1.8 billion of large scale solar projects worldwide, with development and long-term power contracts for 482 megawatts of solar projects. Daniel will discuss SolarReserve Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) with molten salt energy storage technology, its operational Crescent Dunes project and provide an update on SolarReserve’s plans to build the Aurora Solar Energy Project in Port Augusta, the first of a number of projects planned for South Australia.

RSVP here

Divest from fossil fuels – Market Forces event 5 October

FOE members are invited to meet with Market Forces presenter Jack Bertolus at 5pm prior to the event.

Is your money making the world a better place? Or is it supporting the continuation of fossil fuel and other industries that contribute to climate change?

Sustainable Communities and Market Forces event

Wednesday 5 October
The Joinery
111 Franklin St Adelaide

Did you know that banks lend our money to large coal, oil and gas companies and projects, and super funds and insurance companies invest customers’ money in these industries.

Come along to learn more about how you can exert influence and make a positive change for sustainability by making sure your money is working for good. Divesting your money from fossil fuels is a powerful thing to do. It is the opposite of investment – it’s taking your money away from damaging industries and businesses that threaten our future.

Our speaker is Jack Bertolus from Market Forces, a Melbourne-based organisation that works with the community to prevent investment in projects that harm the environment and drive global warming.

A simple meal will be provided from 6pm, prior to the talk – we suggest a donation of $5 per person to help cover costs.

This is a DIVESTMENT DAY event. Saturday 8 October 2016 is Divestment Day. Meet at 11am in Hindmarsh Square to join with others to deliver a message to banks about their obligations regarding compliance the Paris Agreement to keep global warming to below two degrees.

Please book for this free event via Eventbrite to help with catering.… Read more >>

The Trans-Pacific Partnership: Undermining global efforts to address climate change

screen-shot-2016-09-15-at-9-16-27-pmLast weekend, President Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping officially signed onto the Paris Agreement on climate. Yet, President Obama is simultaneously pushing a trade agenda that directly undermines the U.S.’s ability to address climate change.

A new report from the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy finds that the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) involving the U.S. and eleven Pacific Rim countries, totaling nearly 40 percent of the global economy, would benefit high greenhouse emitting industries like energy and agriculture, while restricting national and local policies that respond to climate change.

The report, The Climate Cost of Free Trade: How the TPP and other trade deals undermine the Paris climate agreement, finds that existing trade agreements and proposed new rules in the TPP would impact countries’ climate goals committed to as part of the global Paris Climate Agreement.

“There is a real blindspot for the climate within trade agreements, and particularly the TPP,” says Ben Lilliston, IATP’s Director of Climate Strategies and the report’s author. “Trade deals are driving a form of corporate-led globalization that is highly extractive of natural resources and completely ignores the damage it does to the climate. If we don’t reform our trade agreements and reject the TPP, it will be nearly impossible to reach our climate goals agreed to in Paris.”

National commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, covering sectors like energy, agriculture, and forestry, are at the heart of the Paris climate agreement. All TPP participating countries have submitted a climate plan as part of the Paris deal. Yet, the IATP report found that the TPP expands the reach of past trade deals that have struck down renewable energy programs supporting green jobs, provided agribusiness more opportunities to challenge regulations that protect farmers and consumers, and limited the ability of countries to regulate dirty energy production like coal mining, fracking, and off-shore drilling.Read more >>