Adelaide FoE Notes

These posts are to appear in the fortnightly newsletter

More Dumplings, Not Dumps

Everyone likes dumplings, but no one likes dumps.

The Federal government is trying to impose a radioactive waste dump in South Australia, despite State legislation that makes them illegal, opposition from Traditional Owners and a truly flawed plan that’s done nothing but cost money and divide communities.

Please support the communities of the Flinders Ranges and Kimba by sending a submission to the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science.

Get friends, family and co-workers together, eat dumplings and say NO to nuclear waste in SA and host a “Dumplings not Dumps” session.

It’s not too late to have your say! FoE Adelaide are hosting a Dumplings Not Dumps event next Monday night at Christie Walk (entry at 101 Sturt St), in the Common Room.

If you’re in Adelaide, bring your laptop and write yours on monday night while having a dumpling dinner.
Where: Christie Walk Common Room,
When: 6.30pm – 8.30pm,  Monday 9th December

Please RSVP by email — we want to ensure we have plenty of dumplings!… Read more >>

Adelaide FoE AGM, take 2

Dear Friends:
The recent session of the 2019 FoE Adelaide AGM having been just inquorate,
we have re-convened for 6.00pm @ the Christie Walk Common Room
(entry via 101 Sturt Street) on Monday 9th December.

If you are time poor, but would like to see FoE Adelaide continue its work in the coming year, this is the one meeting of the year tailor made for you to attend.

Warmest regards

David Faber
Facilitator

Note: The re-convened AGM is just before the Dumplings Not Dumps session on Monday, so not only do you get to see David running a super fast AGM (30 mins, max!), but you get to followup with a dumpling feast as your write your submission on the proposed nuclear dump in SA.… Read more >>

Resurgence of carbon markets threatens people, politics and planet

from Expectations of Friends of the Earth International for COP25

December 2019, Madrid, Spain

As the international climate talks open today in Madrid, Spain, the world faces the re-emergence of a threat that could derail urgent action on the climate crisis: Carbon Markets are back on the table as a proposed ‘solution’ to reduce emissions.

Dipti Bhatnagar, Climate Justice and Energy Programme Coordinator for Friends of the Earth International, from Mozambique, said:

“Big polluters must be rubbing their hands in glee that carbon market mechanisms, which further dilute the already weak and inadequate Paris emissions targets, are back on the agenda. We will fight them tooth and nail. The climate crisis is already devastating lives. Emissions are still rising. Now is not the time to offer an escape route to polluting Northern country governments and big oil.”

Tackling the climate crisis requires a total, radical and immediate shift away from fossil fuels and a huge flow of finance from the global North to the global South. This is needed to repay the ecological debt, for a just transition and for loss and damage. We need an economic and political system which serves the needs of people, not profit – nothing less than radical system change.

Bhatnagar continued: 

“Carbon markets fail to deliver emissions reductions or adequate climate action and impact horrifically on Indigenous Peoples and local communities. They only serve to strengthen corporate power and impunity, deflect responsibility from rich historical polluters and prevent urgent and equitable action on climate change.”

With an abrupt change of location a month ago, COP25 becomes the third of four consecutive UN climate conferences to be held in Europe. As a result, Southern participation continues to be undermined. Northern governments and corporations will be hoping for less scrutiny from communities in the South so they can try and push through dangerous false solutions.Read more >>

Beyond Coal

Coal power generation is the single largest contributor to greenhouse gas emissions in Australia, being responsible for over one quarter of total emissions. Given that burning coal is our leading contributor to climate change, moving our electricity supply away from coal is one of the quickest, most efficient ways of doing our part to act.

There is a pathway to avoiding the worst impacts of climate change, and avoiding a catastrophic rise in global temperatures. Retiring every coal-burning power station over the next decade — and replacing them with clean energy generation and storage — is the simplest and most effective way for Australia to do our fair share of reducing greenhouse emissions to a safe level. It’s our best shot to tackle climate change, protect people, and protect our planet’s natural places.

That is why we have joined together with six other community-based groups to launch the Beyond Coal campaign.

Change is already happening in the coal sector. But this transition needs to be managed. We need a plan to drive the changes that climate science tells us are needed, while looking after the workers and communities who currently rely on coal.

As Australia’s energy system diversifies, so too will the jobs available in the sector. According to the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, investing in relatively new technologies — like battery storage, battery storage, hydrogen, lithium and rare earths — could be one of our best opportunities to create regional jobs and grow industry hubs.  In Victoria, the proposed Star of the South offshore wind farm is expected to provide 12,000 jobs in construction, and 300 ongoing jobs – and could provide up to one-fifth of the state’s electricity needs… Read more >>

Repairing the Planet

Practical solutions to environmental concerns are addressed with the hope that filmmaker Damon Gameau’s  daughter, 21 years old in the year 2040, will face a hopeful future.

The film looks at possible solutions in four key areas:

Energy

We look at what can be done with solar panels capturing sunlight and trading it between neighbouring houses.

What happens if we extend the idea to trade electricity over a larger region?

Can we manage our own energy more easily and cheaply than a massive centralised system?

Transport

Is it the end of the motorcar?

Or should me move to rented autonomous vehicles?

Perhaps better public transport?

And what could we do with the space currently taken up by super highways?

Food Production

Can we revise our food production to take better care of the soils, making them more productive

and allowing them to store more carbon at the same time?

Will growing food locally be more productive?

Should we move to a vegetarian diet?

Education

How can we release the creativity of those denied education?

What might happen if people who couldn’t afford education

— or were denied it by virtue of belief, gender or background — were given

the chance to create opportunities and solutions for their regions?

If you’d like to see this movie, you can get tickets for $15/$10 concession, or two tickets for $20.

Why not bring a friend to our screening on November 12th, 7pm at the Mercury?

Tickets: https://www.trybooking.com/564492
Click to book!
 … Read more >>