Nuclear

“Chernobyl” Faithfully Recreates the World’s Worst Nuclear Disaster

Some of us were adults in 1986, some of us were children or teenagers, and some of us didn’t yet exist. Because of that, we all have different memories of Chernobyl – the world’s deadliest nuclear disaster.

That didn’t stop the screenwriter Craig Mazin, or the director John Renck, from creating the five-part mini-series Chernobyl, and it didn’t stop American network HBO, and the British network Sky, from producing the series.

Chernobyl is certainly a change of pace for both Renck and Mazin. Renck had directed episodes of the TV series Breaking Bad and The Walking Dead. Mazin had written the Hangover and Scary Movie movie franchises.

[…]

For those who don’t know much about the disaster, the series is an eye-opener. For those who do know what happened, the series is a near-perfect recreation of the events that took place in Soviet Ukraine on the morning of April 27, 1986.

 

Mazin said that Chernobyl arose out of his interest in writing something that addressed the fact that, “We are struggling with the global war on the truth.” For each episode, Mazin has created a podcast that can be found on Youtube.

Researching for the truth

To create the series, Mazin consulted many different kinds of sources, “from government reports to first person accounts to scientific journals to historical works, photo essays.” And, he worked hard to avoid putting false drama into his scripts because as he said, “So much of what happens in the show is just shocking. It’s shocking to believe that that’s what happened.

Well, our feeling was if we started pushing the envelope on those things then we would diminish the impact of all the things that we were accurate about, so we stayed as accurate as we could.”

— full story at interestingengineering.com

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Nuclear power exits Australia’s energy debate, enters culture wars

An update by Jim Green, June 13th

What do these politicians and ex-politicians have in common: Clive PalmerTony AbbottCory BernardiBarnaby JoyceMark LathamJim MolanCraig KellyEric Abetz, and David Leyonhjelm?

Yes, they’re all men, and all so far to the right of the political spectrum that right-wing ideologues think they are right-wing ideologues.

And they all support nuclear power. To the far-right, pro-nuclear luminaries listed above we could add the right-wing of the right-wing National Party (pretty much all of them), the Minerals Council of Australia (who lobby furiously for clean nuclear and clean coal), the Business Council of Australia, media shock-jocks Alan Jones and Peta Credlin (and others), the Murdoch media (especially The Australian newspaper), the Citizens Electoral Council, and the Institute of Public Affairs and its front group the Australian Environment Foundation.

It’s no surprise that the far-right supports nuclear power (if only because the ‘green left’ opposes it). But in Australia, support for nuclear power is increasingly marginalised to the far-right. Indeed support for nuclear power has become a sign of tribal loyalty: you support nuclear power (and coal) or you’re a cultural Marxist, and you oppose renewables and climate change action or you’re a cultural Marxist.

Support for nuclear power in Australia has ebbed in the aftermath of the Fukushima disaster, catastrophic costs overruns on reactor projects, and the falling costs of renewables. Dr Ziggy Switkowski used to be nuclear power’s head cheerleader in Australia and he led the Howard government’s review of nuclear power in 2006. But he said last year that “the window for gigawatt-scale nuclear has closed” and that nuclear power is no longer cheaper than renewables with costs rapidly shifting in favour of renewables.

Peter Farley, a fellow of the Australian Institution of Engineers, wrote in RenewEconomy earlier this year: “As for nuclear the 2,200 MW Plant Vogtle [in the US] is costing US$25 billion plus financing costs, insurance and long term waste storage.Read more >>

Show Labor you want a fossil-free future! Rally this Sunday (16th)

This weekend Labor is holding their National Conference in Adelaide.

While Labor have been making the right noises over renewables, the Leader of the Opposition has been relatively quiet about Adani coal and fossil fuels in general.

Groups concerned about the proposed nuclear dump in SA, the continued government support for fossil fuels and oil exploration in the Bight want to show the ALP that they need to adopt sensible policies if they want our support.

South Australians are putting climate change on the agenda.

Join the rally outside the ALP National Conference at the Adelaide Convention Centre from 1-2pm on Sunday 16 December.

Labor’s climate plan must include moving Australia beyond fossil fuels to clean renewable energy.

That means:

  • Stop Adani
  • Stop oil exploration in the Great Australian Bight
  • Stop fracking for gas
  • Phase out the export of oil, gas and coal

This Conference is where the ALP will commit to the policies they’ll take to the Federal Election next year.

Join Friends (of the Earth) for a fossil fuel free future! Come along this Sunday to the Convention Centre on North Tce


Schedule of activities:

 8.30-10am Anti-Poverty Network’s Rally to Raise Newstart, No Dump Alliance & AYCC Stop Adani – Adelaide Convention Centre top of escalators

12:30 – 2pm No More Fossil Fuels Rally (say you’re coming and share with your friends on Facebook)

12:30pm – Uluru Statement from the Heart, led by former Uluru Working Group Co-chair Thomas Mayor.

2pm – Carols Against Coal (more info and livestream on Facebook)

The No Dump Alliance will have a table at the eventRead more >>

Anti Dump rally Sat Nov 3rd

Please come to the Don’t Dump on SA Rally on Kaurna Land at Parliament House, North Terrace, Adelaide
at 11.30am on Saturday 3rd November.

Last week we found out that the Barngarla Injunction hearing will go back to court on 30 January 2019.
Here is a link to a statement from DIIS (the Department of Industry Innovation and Science). Yesterday there was an article in The Advertiser saying that the Minister’s decision may be delayed until next year.

With the ballot on hold, this rally is more important than ever.

We need to come together and say NO to a radioactive waste dump in SA and ensure that the government ends this terrible site selection process.
We want the government to take all three sites in SA off the table and to hold a full independent inquiry into the best way to manage our most dangerous waste. They must stop targeting remote and regional areas and give Aboriginal people a right of veto for proposals that threaten their country and culture.
We want a huge presence at the rally to show Minister Canavan that he does NOT have broad community support for a waste dump in SA and that he can’t impose one on this unwilling community.